Understanding Resting And Maximum Heart Rate

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Throughout the past years, business has combined the health and technology industries to create a society where fitness tracking has become a regular pastime. People have become more invested in their health and want fun devices to assist in that. These smartwatches and apps have made it easier than ever to know what your exact heart rate is, how many hours of sleep you get, or how far you run. However, with all the knowledge presented to you, it’s equally important to actually understand what those numbers mean to best achieve all of your fitness goals. A big part of this is knowing the different active and resting heart rate zones. 

Your ideal resting and maximum heart rate are dependent mostly on your age. That said, there is no one-size-fits-all guide, so if you are concerned about other health areas it’s important to talk with a doctor or trainer to find goals that work best for you. The charts below are composed of averages. 

Before hitting the gym or heading to hot yoga, you should really understand what your resting heart rate is and how those numbers are affected. Your resting heart rate is exactly that — your heart rate when you are at rest. The average resting heart rate is between 60 and 100 beats per minute (bpm). This number can be affected by outside factors such as sleep, anxiety, stress, hormones, and medication. Your fitness can also have a say in your resting heart rate, as athletes typically have a lower number than others. The lower your resting heart rate is, the better. Your heart doesn’t have to work as hard to pump blood throughout your body and to maintain a healthy rhythm. 


Now it’s time to pump those jams and get moving! Understanding your maximum heart rate is important while exercising because that’s how you really make the most out of your workout. Depending on your activity, your target heart rate can vary between 50-85% of your maximum heart rate. Your maximum heart rate is 100% and you going to town on that treadmill. 


Having a fitness device has made it extremely easy to keep track of your heart rate, both resting and active. However, if you don’t have something available to you, your heart rate can still be recorded! It just has to be done the old fashioned way, putting two fingers on an artery by your wrist and count the pulses over a 30-second period. Take that number and double it to find your bpm. 

Using this chart is a good guide to better understand the numbers you should be reaching and working for. That said, don’t try to hit your maximum heart rate right off the bat. Get your body moving and heart pumping before you really increase the difficulty. If you find your heart rate is too fast or too slow for what your goal is, then it’s a good sign you need to adjust your workout. 

Having a better understanding of your resting and active heart rate is a really great tool to use in life and while exercising! Taking this knowledge and putting it to use can bring you one step closer to living a healthier and happier life. 

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